189 Greenbriar Blvd., Suite A,

Covington, LA 70433

 

PAY ONLINE

Proper Dental Care for Children

Always Available to Answer Your Questions

  • Teething
    Teething
  • Teething
    Teething
    Normally the first tooth erupts between ages 6 to 12 months. Gums are sore, tender and sometimes irritable until the age of 3. Rubbing sore gums gently with a clean finger, the back of a cold spoon or a cold, wet cloth helps soothe the gums. Teething rings work well, but avoid teething biscuits—they contain sugar that is not good for baby teeth. While your baby is teething, it is important to monitor the teeth for signs of baby bottle decay. Examine the teeth, especially on the inside or the tongue side, every two weeks for dull spots (whiter than the tooth surface) or lines. A bottle containing anything other than water and left in an infant’s mouth while sleeping can cause decay. This happens because sugar in the liquid mixes with bacteria in dental plaque, forming acids that attack the tooth enamel. Each time a child drinks liquids containing sugar, acids attack the teeth for about 20 minutes. When awake, saliva carries away the liquid. During sleep, the saliva flow significantly decreases and liquids pool around the child’s teeth for long periods, covering the teeth in acids.
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  • Infant's New Teeth
    Infant's New Teeth
  • Infant's New Teeth
    Infant's New Teeth
    The primary, or “baby,” teeth play a crucial role in dental development. Without them, a child cannot chew food properly and has difficulty speaking clearly. Primary teeth are vital to development of the jaws and for guiding the permanent (secondary) teeth into place when they replace the primary teeth around age 6. Since primary teeth guide the permanent teeth into place, infants with missing primary teeth or infants who prematurely lose primary teeth may require a space maintainer, a device used to hold the natural space open. Without a maintainer, the teeth can tilt toward the empty space and cause permanent teeth to come in crooked. Missing teeth should always be mentioned to your family dentist. The way your child cares for his/her primary teeth plays a critical role in how he/she treats the permanent teeth. Children and adults are equally susceptible to plaque and gum problems—hence, the need for regular care and dental checkups.
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  • Why Primary Teeth are Important
    Why Primary Teeth are Important
  • Why Primary Teeth are Important
    Why Primary Teeth are Important
    Primary teeth are important for several reasons. Foremost, good teeth allow a child to eat and maintain good nutrition. Healthy teeth allow for clear pronunciation and speech habits. The self-image that healthy teeth give a child is immeasurable. Primary teeth also guide eruption of the permanent teeth.
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  • Good Diet and Healthy Teeth
    Good Diet and Healthy Teeth
  • Good Diet and Healthy Teeth
    Good Diet and Healthy Teeth
    The teeth, bones and soft tissue of the mouth require a healthy, well-balanced diet. A variety of foods from the five food groups helps minimize (and avoid) cavities and other dental problems. Most snacks that children eat cause cavities, so children should only receive healthy foods like vegetables, low-fat yogurt and cheeses, which promote strong teeth.
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  • Infant Tooth Eruption
    Infant Tooth Eruption
  • Infant Tooth Eruption
    Infant Tooth Eruption
    A child’s teeth actually start forming before birth. As early as 4 months of age, the primary or “baby” teeth push through the gums—the lower central incisors are first, then the upper central incisors. The remainder of the 20 primary teeth typically erupt by age 3, but the place and order varies. Permanent teeth begin eruption around age 6, starting with the first molars and lower central incisors. This process continues until around age 21. Adults have 28 secondary (permanent) teeth—32 including the third molars (wisdom teeth).
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  • Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay
    Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay
  • Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay
    Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay
    Tooth decay in infants can be minimized or totally prevented by not allowing sleeping infants to breast or bottle-feed. Infants that need a bottle to comfortably fall asleep should be given a water-filled bottle or a pacifier. Our office is dedicated to fighting baby bottle tooth decay. Let us know if you notice any signs of decay or anything unusual in your child’s mouth.
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Available Treatment Types

  • Sealants
    Sealants
  • Sealants
    Sealants
    Sealants are a preventive measure recommended for permanent molars. There are times they are recommended for baby molars as well. Even if your child is very diligent about brushing and flossing, it is nearly impossible to clean the tiny grooves of these teeth. Food and bacteria get trapped and begin to cause decay. The sealant is a shaded plastic applied to the biting surface of these molars and help to keep them cavity free. The sealants, however, do not prevent decay between the teeth. Therefore, it is still very important to keep up with daily flossing.
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  • X-Rays
    X-Rays
  • X-Rays
    X-Rays
    It is recommended that your child get X-rays of the molar teeth once per year. This detects cavities developing between the teeth. There are also times when additional X-rays will be suggested. Some of these may include a Panorex or Periapical Films. These are needed to survey erupting teeth, diagnose bone diseases, evaluate the results of an injury, or plan orthodontic treatment. In shore, X-rays allow dentists to diagnose and treat conditions that cannot be detected during a clinical examination. When these problems or conditions are found and treated early, dental care is more comfortable and affordable. At our office we also take special care to minimize the exposure of your child to radiation. Lead body aprons and shields help protect your child. Not to mention, today's equipment restricts the X-ray beam to the area of interest. This, along with our use of digital X-rays, assures that your child receives a minimal amount of radiation exposure.
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  • EZ Pedo
    EZ Pedo
  • EZ Pedo
    EZ Pedo
    The EZ-Pedo crown is a Zirconia crown. It is all white and is a great alternative to Stainless Steel Crowns. Zirconia is said to be the high-tech ceramic of the future. It is virtually indestructible, like no other dental material. This crown is very natural and esthetic. That means that most will not even know that it is there. "With vibrant, natural beauty, EZ-Pedo crowns are making a revolutionary change in pediatric dentistry. Built for looks and engineered for success, our crowns are the perfect answer when a crown is required. But esthetics is a priority." We have found that more insurance companies are covering this treatment option just as they would the Stainless Steel Crown. Dr. Brausell will let you know if this option is right for your child.
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  • Space Maintainers
    Space Maintainers
  • Space Maintainers
    Space Maintainers
    Baby teeth are important to your child's present and future dental health. They encourage normal development of the jaw, bones, and muscles. These teeth also save space for the permanent teeth and guide them into position. Some baby teeth do not fall out until a child is between 12 and 14 years of age. A Space Maintainer is used when a baby tooth is lost too soon. When this happens the teeth beside the empty space may drift into that space. Also, the teeth on the other jaw may move up or down to fill the gap. This takes away the space for the permanent teeth and can cause more extensive orthodontic treatment in the future. The Space Maintainer is used to hold open the empty space left by a lost tooth. This prevents movement of the remaining teeth until the permanent tooth takes its natural position in the jaw. This form of treatment is easier for the child and more affordable then trying to move the teeth back in place with orthodontic treatment later.
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  • Nitrous Ixode (Laughing Gas)
    Nitrous Ixode (Laughing Gas)
  • Nitrous Ixode (Laughing Gas)
    Nitrous Ixode (Laughing Gas)
    Sometimes a child may feel anxious before or during treatment. In these times your child may need more support than a gentle, caring manner to feel comfortable. Nitrous Oxide, or laughing gas, is a safe, effective sedative agent used to calm a child's fear. This coupled with effective communication we can achieve a successful dental appointment. Additionally, at the end of the treatment your child breathes in strictly oxygen and the nitrous is completely eliminated from the lungs. This leaves no lingering effects. Here at Dr. Brasuell's office we call this "happy air".
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  • Sedation
    Sedation
  • Sedation
    Sedation
    Sedation may be recommended for children with a level of anxiety that prevents good coping skills, those who are very young and do not understand how to cope in a cooperative fashion, or those requiring extensive dental treatment. Sedation can also be helpful for children with special needs. Sedation is used for a child's safety and comfort during dental procedures. Sedation also promotes a better environment for providing dental care. Various medications can be used to sedate a child. Medicines will be selected based upon your child's overall health, level of anxiety, and dental treatment recommendations. Dr. Brasuell uses conscious sedation effectively by following the sedation guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Dr. Brasuell will discuss sedation options and patient monitoring for the safety and comfort of your child. Some important details will be given to you prior to your visit that you should read through very thoroughly. A very important fact to remember is that your child will often perceive a patient's anxiety which makes them more fearful. Please never use words that connect to fear of pain. Here at Dr. Brasuell's office we do not say things like hurt, pinch, or shot. Your child, in most cases, is unaware of all that is involved and we do our best to keep it that way. If you have questions, please call and we can assist you with our "child friendly" terms that are appropriate for your child's dental visit. Always let us know if your child becomes ill. It may be necessary to reschedule your child's visit. Also, make us aware if your child is taking any over-the-counter or prescribed medications.
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  • Hospital Cases
    Hospital Cases
  • Hospital Cases
    Hospital Cases
    There are times that a child may be treated under General Anesthesia for their dental needs. This could be for various reasons. Some different reasons for this recommendation could be extensive dental needs or a fearful/ anxious very young child that does not understand how to be cooperative. This treatment option can also be useful for patients with special health care needs. A physical evaluation is required prior to general anesthesia for dental care. This assessment provides information to ensure the safety of your child during the general anesthesia procedure. We will keep you informed about any evaluation appointments that may be required.
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189 Greenbriar Blvd., Suite A,

Covington, LA 70433

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Copyright © 2016 Todd S. Brasuell, DDS Pediatric Dentistry